Tag Archives: Test Prep

ACT deja vu!

LEAP blog post dated July 2, 2015: ACT Changes for Fall 2015 – Here We Go Again. Can you believe barely shy of a year later (as in DAYS) the world of college admission testing is experiencing a flashback? The constant changes with ACT and SAT are leaving many of us with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. On June 27th, 2016, I received a “confidential” email from ACT stating a major announcement would follow on the 28th. A step back in time to the ACT optional writing test being scored once again on the 2-12 point scale. In September 2015, ACT … Continue reading

Tips for Getting ACT Extended Time

You’ve never finished a PSAT, Aspire or Pre-ACT test within the allotted time. Performing your best on the ACT is daunting task, because you most always require additional time at school. Quit stressing and apply for extended time on the ACT.  You never know, you may just qualify and can relax a bit! Who Qualifies and How Students with physical disabilities, medical conditions, hearing or visual impairment, those who have diagnosed ADHD, psychiatric conditions or learning disabilities may apply for extended time.  Before you apply for accommodations, you’ll need to register online for your ACT test. As with everything in the college selection and application … Continue reading

Where Are My PSAT Scores & What Do They Mean?!

READ ON TO FIND OUT HOW TO LOCATE YOUR SCORES AND LEARN THE OTHER CHANGES! You’ve likely heard the SAT is redesigned (rSAT) and debuting in March 2016. What you may not know is the PSAT (a pre-SAT) taken by virtually every U.S. 11th grader (and many younger students) was also redesigned and debuted in October 2015.  It’s also the qualifying test for the National Merit Scholarship Competition (NMSC). In previous years, juniors who took the PSAT in October received their paper score report in December right before winter break. If you know this, you may be left wondering where … Continue reading

Redesigned ACT & SAT: How It Affects YOU!

The ACT had some minor changes starting with the reading portion in December 2014, then in February 2015 to the science portion, followed by an overhaul of the writing test in September 2015. That massive shift with the writing test left many seniors retesting in the fall of their senior year caught between two different versions of the writing test and frankly, dazed and confused. In April 2014, CollegeBoard announced a massive overhaul of the SAT test to “deliver opportunity” to underserved students, or was it to financially catch back up to the ACT who overtook them in 2012?  Regardless, … Continue reading

Critical Deadlines on the College Bound Journey

If you plan to send your child to a four-year college living on campus, your investment will likely be over $100,000 without any gift aid in the form of scholarships and grants. This is based on the U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (2015).  Private schools run higher than the $23,872 of all four-year institutes at $35,074. Educating your children could likely be your most expensive investment outside of owning a home. Because of this, it is worthy of planning a careful, thorough and measured as a home purchase or your own retirement and savings to garner an excellent return … Continue reading

The Expensive Choice of Testing Prior to Prep

Expense can be calculated in the terms of time and money. Taking the ACT or SAT for a “trial run” before embarking on test prep and serious testing is a costly mistake. LEAP’s proven approach since 1999 is as follows: Take a prep course – we hope you’ll choose LEAP! Take the first attempt at the ACT and/or SAT. Analyze scores and decide which test to retest on. 57% of students increase on a second attempt. If necessary (not always the case), do additional prep (LEAP offers individualized tutoring) to strengthen weak areas on the test. Retest on the ACT … Continue reading

The Redesigned PSAT for 2015

You took the PSAT in October 2014 as a sophomore as practice for the “real thing” in October 2015 in the junior year when it counts for National Merit only to find out the 2015 is completely overhauled and redesigned. Insert sigh. So what’s new and can be expected on either October 14 or 28, 2015? It’s longer! The new PSAT is 35 minutes longer than the old version. It still lacks an essay section, but has been expanded to 2 hours and 45 minutes; it’s almost as long as the multiple choice new SAT which debuts in March 2016, so it’s good practice for … Continue reading

ACT Changes for Fall 2015 – Here We Go Again

While the SAT is undergoing a major overhaul to premiere in March of 2016 (watch our video explaining the redesigned SAT/PSAT), the ACT is announcing a few, albeit rather small comparatively speaking, changes as well. Some of these changes were seen in the last school year, but the most major change, to the writing test, debuts in September. LEAP has invested a great deal of time and research on SAT and ACT changes and our test prep program started in 1999 is at the ready for the newest versions of the tests! Reading The test remains 40 questions in 35 … Continue reading

Determining ACT? SAT? or Both?

Good news! All colleges accept both the ACT and SAT tests without preference being given to one over the other. Some schools are even test optional. So how does a student determine which test to invest in? Consider PRE-Test Scores Up until April 2014, the pre-ACT was called the PLAN test. It was based on a 32 point scale. This scale allowed easy conversion to predictive ACT scores by adding 3-4 points to a PLAN composite. These predictive scores are also listed on your PLAN score report. For students graduating in 2016 or earlier, they are operating off PLAN scores … Continue reading

Finally, MY TURN! Chapter 1

It’s my turn!! I’ve worked for 15 years as an independent college counselor assisting families on college selection, application, career selection and admission. Finally, I have a high school junior, and I get the privilege (yes, I just said privilege) of embarking on the journey from a different perspective. Most certainly this will result in moments of wanting to pull my hair out (as my clients have attested to me), but hopefully many more of fun and joy. I’m frequently asked, “What would you do if he were your son?” when parents are seeking advice from me. In effort to … Continue reading

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